Tesla Model 3, Model Y Got New Battery Chemistry, and Here’s What It Means

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Tesla Model 3, Model Y Got New Battery Chemistry, and Here’s What It Means

The news emerged in late August: Tesla was offering a chance for electric-car buyers who’d ordered a Model 3 Standard Range+ to get their car sooner. That same month, it emerged that orders placed for less expensive Model 3s wouldn’t be filled until 2022. And the same went as well for Standard Range Tesla Model Y versions. (Last month, Tesla renamed the Standard Range models, which are now simply called Rear Wheel Drive.)

The new option would allow Tesla to deliver its least expensive Model 3 cars more quickly, at a penalty of just 10 miles on EPA range ratings: 253 miles vs 263 miles—for the same sticker price. In turn, it could presumably shift more of its traditional battery packs to the hot-selling Model Y compact crossover.

Until this summer, all Model 3s and Model Ys sold in North America had been powered by batteries with thousands of small cylindrical cells, using a nickel-cobalt-aluminum (or NCA) chemistry, from Tesla’s Nevada Gigafactory. The new pack not only uses a different chemistry known as lithium-iron-phosphate (or LiFP), but the cells themselves were prismatic—meaning the contents of the battery casing were entirely different.

For the full story, check out this article from Car And Driver.

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