EPA’s New, Higher Emissions Standards Will Mean a 40-MPG Fleet Average in 2026

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EPA’s New, Higher Emissions Standards Will Mean a 40-MPG Fleet Average in 2026

Today, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) finalized its new rules for what it is calling the “most ambitious federal greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions standards for passenger cars and light trucks ever.” The new standards, which will go into effect for model year 2023 through 2026 vehicles, are a precursor to the next set of standards, which will affect 2027 model year and later vehicles.

While the EPA technically sets tailpipe emissions limits, not fuel-economy standards (those are set by the U.S. National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, or NHTSA), these new regulations will of course impact the miles-per-gallon ratings of new cars and trucks. The new rules will mean that the fleet average will climb to around 40 mpg in 2026, compared to the 38-mpg average that appeared in earlier proposals. The most recent was from this past August, when the Biden administration said it would work to roll back Trump-era rules that loosened the emissions standards and would have resulted in more greenhouse gasses in the atmosphere and a fleet average of just 32 mpg. The new rules are even more stringent than those proposed by President Obama and are expected to prevent 3.1 billion tons of CO2 emissions from getting into the air through 2050.

For the full story, check out this article from Car And Driver.

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